Works 2016

 

 

After the Feast

Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

The Managed Horizon, 2016. Acrylic, iPhone digitizer replacement screens, approx. 45 x 80 x 61 inches. Photo: Carl Gunhouse

 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Devotion and Livestock, 2016. Laser-cut acrylic, 6 x 65 x 35 inches. Photo: Carl Gunhouse

 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Default Settings, 2016. Acrylic and vinyl, 32 x 32 x 32 inches. Photo: Carl Gunhouse

 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Firmware Update (left), 2 Ohms and an Analog Displacement, 2016. Graphene nanoplatelet powder and acrylic on canvas, LEDs, 21 x 45 x 13 inches; Graphene sheet, graphene nanoplatelet powder, couplers, RGB LED, fiber optic cable, oil, power bank, acrylic, approx. 48 x 36 x 5 inches. Photo: Carl Gunhouse

 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Umbra v2, 2016. Digital projection and CNC-routed acrylic, 10.2 x 63 x 0.8 inches; projection d.v. Photo: Carl Gunhouse

 

Consisting of 6 sculptural situations within a room sized grid, this show considers a world on the cusp of the post-human; it is also in part, my own reaction to the jolting events that have taken place in 2016.

The works on display come from my perpetual fascination with absurd behaviors, particularly as they relate to our virtualized existence, and I feel – at least I hope – that the works also convey a turn in my thinking toward the more physical side of the digital, to the fumes it can leave behind, and to the all too real elements that are the fuel for this “digitalness.”

Concerning the sculptural circumstances themselves, in Devotion and Livestock, I use logically sound algorithms to arrive at illogical, unsound results. It is a visualized increase correlation between Donald Trump’s campaign donations and reported cases of diseased meat and poultry. In The Managed Horizon, I ritualize hardware manufacturing processes and the dependability of the grid to envision a self-replicating, quietly violent, Anthropocene age.

Arguing that a 3D modeling program’s standard operating environment is an ideal setting for a mundane dystopia, as with the grid engulfing all of the works in this exhibition, Default Settings engages with the parallax between positive technological progress, and the impassioned, but often empty quantification of daily life into bits of manageable data.

Umbra v2, fabricated from data artifacts, and accompanied by a projection of its digitally rendered shadow, addresses the narrowing of the gap between concepts of the digital and the physical. And in both Firmware Update and 2 Ohms and an Analog Displacement, I comment on survivalist fashion and the consumption of natural resources at the behest of technology fetishism.

 

Transmitter Gallery, New York, curated by Jen Hitchings
Press Release

 
 
 
 
 

Channel Corruptions

Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Umbra v2, 2016. Digital projection and CNC-routed acrylic, 10.2 x 63 x 0.8 inches; projection d.v.

 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Encrypt_Decrypt, 2015. Digital projection and CNC-routed acrylic, 88 x 54 inches; 5 x 35 x 1.5 inches

 

The works in this exhibition explore digital error and the paradoxical quality of compression artifacts, which accompany the distortion and decay of data, while at the same time manifesting as new objects and ontologies for observation.

 

CAFA International Gallery, Beijing, curated by Naiyi Wang and Wenjie Sun
Press Release

 
 
 
 

Thermal Strategies: Trouble in Paradise

Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

2 Ohms and an Analog Displacement, 2016. (From right) Graphene sheet, couplers, RGB LED, fiber optic cable, oil, power bank, acrylic; graphene nanoplatelet powder, RGB LED, acrylic, approx. 48 x 36 x 5 inches

 
 
 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Firmware Update, 2016. Graphene nanoplatelet powder and acrylic on canvas, LEDs, 21 x 45 x 13 inches

 
 
 
 
Joshua Liebowitz Artist New York City

Barrier 1, 2016. Graphene nanoplatelets and oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

 

In this project I use graphene, sometimes called the twenty-first century wonder material, to extend cartographies and narratives of media, information and hardware.

With the chemical properties of graphene at the microscale well documented in the literature, I focus instead on the manufacturing processes, optical qualities and severe fragility of nanoparticle arrangements at the macroscopic, visible level. This course of action speaks to the fact that, even as the boundaries between digital-born and physical phenomena become increasingly blurred – a kaleidoscoping of first principles that I cherish for sure – this advancing internet of everything is at the same time dependent on very real hardware, land, and earth-mined resources.